Locking Navigation in Storyline


Often when developing eLearning modules, the developer will be required to lock navigation. This decision is made so that the learner will not be able to skip or miss content.

To understand which version is simpler, lets break them down into steps. In my experience with programming, cleaner and simpler code is better as it leaves less room for errors or bugs to arise.

Method 1 - Variable method

The variable method requires the creation of a True/False variable. It can be named anything, but best practice is to use a name that will instantly describe its intended function. I usually use a name like ‘SlideLock’ or some variation of it.

  1. On the slide master, create a trigger that when timeline starts, variable SlideLock is set to true. This way whenever the learner advances to a new slide, the variable is set to true.

The trigger might look like something like:

adjust variable>SlideLock>to>True>when>timeline starts> on slide master

  1. Then on each slide on the module you have to set the next button with a condition, to only work when the variable SlideLock is false.

The trigger might look like something like:

Jump to slide>Next Slide>when>User Clicks>Next Button>if>variable>SlideLock>equal to>false

  1. Then again on each slide you need to establish the factor which will trigger the variable SlideLock to change from True, to False. This change is situational and will be dependant on the slides content. Sometimes it will be the completion of an activity, other times it might be as simple as when the timeline ends.

The trigger might look like something like:

adjust variable>SlideLock>to>False>when>timeline ends> on this slide

Method 2 - Disabled State method

The disabled state method is

  1. On the slide master, create a trigger that when timeline starts, the Next Button on the player will change to a disabled state. This way whenever the learner advances to a new slide, the Next Button on the player will be set to a Disabled state.

The trigger might look something like:

change state of>Next Button>to>Disabled state>when>timeline starts>on slide master

  1. Then on each slide you can establish the factor that when triggered will cause the state of the Next Button on the player to change to Normal State. This is unique as per the specific slides needs. Sometimes it will be the completion of an activity, other times it might be as simple as when the timeline ends.

The trigger might look like something like:

change state of>Next Button>to>Normal state>when>timeline ends> on this slide

Conclusion

Comparing the 2 methods it is quite clearer that the Disabled State method is shorter, and cleaner. Not having to rely on variables makes things considerably simpler, and also easier from a programming stand point.

If you would like to learn more about eLearning and best practices for developing eLearning, please visit www.pathwaytrainingandelearning.com or contact us at info@pathwaysinc.ca.


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